Leftovers: Leftover Dirty Rice = Boudin Balls with Satsuma Pepper Jelly

Every once in a while, two good creations collide and make a really awesome and tasty nibble. Some leftover authentic Louisiana dirty rice turned into fried boudin balls, served with some super awesome satsuma pepper jelly (so good my stash is almost gone!)

Boudin Balls served with Satsuma Pepper Jelly - when two good things collide in your kitchen....and make a happy explosion.

Boudin Balls served with Satsuma Pepper Jelly – when two good things collide in your kitchen….and make a happy explosion.

 

Boudin Balls have become a quintessetial appetizer at many parties around Cajun country.  You can even find them in many gas stations in the area as you travel through south Louisiana.

If you are opp0sed to eating actual boudin itself, these little nibbles are hard to put down.  In reality, they are little more than well-seasoned dirty rice, dipped in an eggwash and coated in bread crumbs and deep-fried.

And everyone knows that just about anything fried, is good!

You will need about 2 to 3 cups leftover dirty rice.

Use a cookie scoop to form the balls.  Really pack it against the side of the bowl as you fill the scooper to prevent the balls from falling apart.  You will round the balls out by rolling the between the palms of your hand later.

Set the balls on a cookie sheet; line the sheet with parchment paper, if desired.

Set the formed boudin balls in the freezer for 30 minutes to 2 hours.

Beat 2 eggs in a small bowl.

In a separate bowl, have about 2 cups of panko bread crumbs, or fresh bread crumbs from whatever bread you have (I used whole wheat pita bread, pulsed in the food processor for a few minutes.

Season the bread crumbs with about a teaspoon of cajun seasoning, adobo, or simply salt and pepper.

Drop the balls in the egg mixture, and roll around.

Transfer the balls to the bread crumbs, and roll around, ensuring that they are equally coated on all sides.

Drop the boudin balls in a hot fryer, and cook until they are good and brown.  Unlike many fried foods, these will not float when done, so, check them often.  Each batch will take 8 to 10 minutes.

Serve plain, or sprinkled with green onions, cajun seasoning.

A great dipping sauce accompaniment would be any local jelly you have available, especially a pepper jelly.  Satsuma pepper jelly, anyone?

NOTE: The boudin balls can be frozen once they either coated or uncoated.  They are commonly sold frozen commercially to restaurants and caterers in that manner.  I would imagine that they would have a 3 to 6 month shelf life in your freezer, depending on whether you have a deep freezer or a regular kitchen freezer.  The colder the freezer, the longer the life.

Form the boudin balls using a cookie scoop, or an ice cream scoop.

Form the boudin balls using a cookie scoop, or an ice cream scoop.

Pack the balls tighter by rolling them between the palms of your hand.  Having your palms slightly moistened with water can help keep them from sticky, but, it's still a sticky business.

Pack the balls tighter by rolling them between the palms of your hand. Having your palms slightly moistened with water can help keep them from sticky, but, it’s still a sticky business.

Have your eggs and bread crumbs ready.  Feel free to season the bread crumbs as desired.  Panko crumbs are recommended; I used fresh bread crumbs made from whole wheat pita bread.

Have your eggs and bread crumbs ready. Feel free to season the bread crumbs as desired. Panko crumbs are recommended; I used fresh bread crumbs made from whole wheat pita bread.

After a brief 30 minute stint in the freezer to set the boudin balls, dip them in the egg wash and roll them in the bread crumbs. Cook them in hot oil (350 degrees) for 8 to 10 minutes, checking them often, as they will not float like most fried foods.

After a brief 30 minute stint in the freezer to set the boudin balls, dip them in the egg wash and roll them in the bread crumbs. Cook them in hot oil (350 degrees) for 8 to 10 minutes, checking them often, as they will not float like most fried foods.

Boudin balls and satsuma  pepper jelly - a nice combination. A sriracha mayonnaise would also be great with these appetizers.

Boudin balls and satsuma pepper jelly – a nice combination. A sriracha mayonnaise would also be great with these appetizers.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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3 thoughts on “Leftovers: Leftover Dirty Rice = Boudin Balls with Satsuma Pepper Jelly

    • I believe that is why most people today use only ground beef or a 50/50 mix of beef and pork. But, it was tasty, and no one complained of a too-liver taste!

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