Andouille Sausage Stuffed Pork Loin

Still without a kitchen, but cooking anyway!  This is one of our favorite dishes that I hope to make when the kitchen is completed.

Buen provecho!

This is a very impressive dish. A very tasty dish. An entree suitable for a holiday or family dinner. But, it’s actually quite simple.  Like many classic dishes, it’s about a special combination of ingredients, and a certain technique.

 

wpid-IMAG0867-1.jpg

 

 

We used to serve this a very long time ago. The sausage in the middle adds fat and flavor to the otherwise pretty lean pork loin.

How to get the sausage in the middle? You could butterfly the loin, opening it up like an envelope, or you could do it by inserting a long boning or chefs knife into each end, using a honing blade to open up the center. Shove the sausage into each end, making sure they meet in the middle. Any apparent unevenness will shrink during baking. They both take about the same amount of time to prepare, and, not having any strings to hold the loin together might impress (a few) some of your friends.

 

wpid-IMAG0854-1.jpg

 

wpid-IMAG0855-1.jpg

 

wpid-IMAG0859-1.jpg

The loin stuffed and seasoned. Do not bake the loin on something like this tray, but make sure to bake it in a large roasting pan (just no photo of that!).

 

This pork loin is exactly 6.0 pounds.  It’s pretty wide in diameter, so I’m thinking it must be from the top part of the loin, up around the shoulders.

There is a little bit of fat left on top, probably about 1/4 inch think.  You could score it, diamond-shaped; scoring it would help some of the fat drain through, plus would cause the pork to have an increased surface skin=more crispy skin.  For some reason, I didn’t do that before rubbing the seasonings on.

About the seasoning rub that I’ve used.  Most people have heard of Paul Prudhomme, the famous Cajun chef who immortalized blackened redfish, and chicken, and tuna, and….Anyway, that’s not important.  What is important is that he has a line of spices and seasonings that are fantastic.  I’ve been using them for over 20 years.  Someone else must be useing them, also, because they still carry them in the stores.  You can also order them on the internet.  What I like about his basic seasonings is that they do not have a lot of salt, unlike most cajun seasonings.  I’m not sure how many different seasonings that are available, but I usually purchase the Poultry Seasoning, the Vegetable Magic, the Pork & Veal seasoning, and some of his chili spices.  Six different chili spices, so you can create your own “chile” blend.  The basic seasonings bottles used to be sold in boxes (not anymore), and inside some of these boxes were recipes.

This is the only one I’ve tried.  This is not true to the original quantities, but, I believe that the ingredients are the same:

  • olive oil
  • yellow mustard
  • pork and veal seasonings
  • thyme, fresh or dried
  • rosemary, fresh or dried

As you can see, I’ve dumped all the seasoning ingredients on top of the loin, and with my hands rubbed it all over.  If you are going to score the meat, do so before rubbing in the seasonings.

Bake at 350 for 20 minutes per pound.

To make a delicious pan gravy from the drippings, place the roasting pan over low heat.  Add 2 to 4 cups of water, and gently scrape up the baked on bits using a wooden spoon or whisk.  Thicken with cornstarch (mix with cold water first – probably about a teaspoon or two, if it doesn’t thicken as much as you like after bringing it to a boil, add a little more) or with flour (I just mix a little flour (about 1 tablespoon for approximately 2 cups) with a 1/4 cup of pan dripping juice in a separate little bowl, shake or whisk with a fork or miniwhisk until no lumps, and add to the gravy to thicken.  Bring to a gentle simmer, continue stirring to loosen up bits.  Taste for seasoning – if you’re roast was well seasoned, you probably will not need to add anything.  The only other thing I like to add is some fresh minced parsley.

Advertisements

5 thoughts on “Andouille Sausage Stuffed Pork Loin

  1. I’m so glad you stopped by so I had a chance to find you! The name of your blog alone won me over! This recipe, though! This is insane! 🙂 I can’t wait to cook this for my son, in particular!

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s